Advertisement

Prognostic value of the Glasgow prognostic score in lung cancer: evidence from 10 studies

Abstract

Objective

To conduct a meta-analysis of prospective and retrospective studies to reveal the relationship between the Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) and overall survival (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with lung cancer.

Methods

Correlative studies were included by searching the databases of PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and PubMed Cochrane Library until April 16, 2017. We combined the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the correlation between GPS and OS or PFS in patients with lung cancer.

Results

Ten studies involving 5,369 participants from several regions were identified through searching databases. In a pooled analysis of all studies, elevated GPS was associated with poorer OS (HR = 2.058; 95% CI, 1.51-2.80; p<0.05). However, the combined data showed no significant relationship between the GPS of 1 or 2, and PFS, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that the patients with GPS ≥1 had poorer OS compared with those with GPS = 0 (HR = 2.01; 95% CI, 1.75-2.32; p<0.001). A similar trend was observed in patients receiving chemotherapy (HR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.17-2.36; p<0.05) and surgery (HR = 2.88; 95% CI, 1.59-5.22; p<0.001) when stratified by treatment.

Conclusions

Increased level of GPS may have a prognostic value in lung cancer. We detected a statistical difference in the association of elevated GPS and poorer OS, though the association was not significant in PFS settings. However, further studies are warranted to draw firm conclusions.

Post author correction

Article Type: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE

DOI:10.5301/ijbm.5000308

Authors

Jing Jin, Kejia Hu, Yongzhao Zhou, Weimin Li

Article History

Disclosures

Financial support: This study was funded by Technology Support Program of Science and Technology Department of Sichuan Province (2014SZ023).
Conflict of interest: None of the authors has financial interest related to this study to disclose.

This article is available as full text PDF.

  • If you are a Subscriber, please log in now.

  • Article price: Eur 36,00
  • You will be granted access to the article for 72 hours and you will be able to download any format (PDF or ePUB). The article will be available in your login area under "My PayPerView". You will need to register a new account (unless you already own an account with this journal), and you will be guided through our online shop. Online purchases are paid by Credit Card through PayPal.
  • If you are not a Subscriber you may:
  • Subscribe to this journal
  • Unlimited access to all our archives, 24 hour a day, every day of the week.

Authors

Affiliations

  • Department of Pulmonary & Critical Care, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu - PR China
  • Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu - PR China
  • Jing Jin and Kejia Hu contributed equally to this study.

Article usage statistics

The blue line displays unique views in the time frame indicated.
The yellow line displays unique downloads.
Views and downloads are counted only once per session.

This article has supplementary materials available to download.

  • If you are a Subscriber, please log in now.

  • Article price: Eur 36,00
  • You will be granted access to the article for 72 hours and you will be able to download any format (PDF or ePUB). The article will be available in your login area under "My PayPerView". You will need to register a new account (unless you already own an account with this journal), and you will be guided through our online shop. Online purchases are paid by Credit Card through PayPal.
  • If you are not a Subscriber you may:
  • Subscribe to this journal
  • Unlimited access to all our archives, 24 hour a day, every day of the week.